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IDrive's versatile and easy-to-use platform is packed with features and different ways to back up, store and recover your company's data, which is why we named it our best pick for small businesses. – Andreas Rivera, June 12, 2018

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Источник: https://www.idrive.com/

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Источник: https://www.carbonite.com/

Previous Topic: Enable Raw Backup and RestoreNext Topic: Entire Node Backup


Perform Raw Backup of a Physical Disk or Volume

You can perform a raw backup of a physical disk or volume using one of the following approaches:

  • Regular backup--Lets you specify a regular device group as the backup destination.
  • Deduplication backup--Lets you specify a deduplication device group as the backup destination.
  • Staging backup--Lets you specify regular device group or a deduplication device group as the staging location, the final destination media, or both.

    Note: You should not specify the same deduplication device group for the staging location and the final destination media for deduplication backups.

To perform raw backups of a physical disk or volume

  1. Open the Arcserve Backup Manager Console.
  2. From the Navigation Bar, click Quick Start, and then click Backup.

    The Backup Manager opens.

  3. Specify the type of backup.
  4. (Optional) Select the Enable Staging check box.
  5. Click the Source tab and locate the physical disks or volumes that you want to back up.
  6. Click the Schedule tab and define the schedule for the backup job.
  7. (Optional) Click the Staging Location tab and specify a staging device group.

    Note: The Staging Location tab displays only when you click the Enable Staging check box on the Start tab.

  8. (Optional) Click the Policies tab and specify the Tape staging policies and Copy policies for the job.

    Note: The Policies tab displays only when you click the Enable Staging check box on the Start tab.

  9. Click the Destination tab and select the device group to store the backup data.
  10. Click Submit.

    The Submit Job dialog opens.

  11. Complete the required fields on the Submit Job dialog and click OK.

    The job is submitted.

Note: Arcserve Backup verifies that you have a valid license for the Enterprise Module on the server where you want to run the backup job. If Arcserve Backup detects the required licenses, the backup job is submitted. If Arcserve Backup does not detect the required licenses, the backup job is not submitted.


Copyright © 2014 Arcserve. All rights reserved.

Previous Topic: Enable Raw Backup and RestoreNext Topic: Entire Node Backup

Источник: https://ftpdocs.broadcom.com/cadocs/0/CA%20ARCserve%20Backup%20r16%205-ENU/Bookshelf_Files/HTML/admingde/rb_perform_raw_backup_of_a_physical_disk_or_volume.htm

OctoPi

Guy Sheffer maintains “OctoPi”, a Raspbian (and thus Debian) based SD card image for the Raspberry Pi that already includes OctoPrint plus everything you need to run it:

  • OctoPrint plus its dependencies
  • MJPG-Streamer for live viewing of prints and timelapse video creation, compatible with various USB webcams and the Raspberry Pi camera

Recommended hardware: Raspberry Pi 3B, 3B+, 4B or Zero 2. Expect print artifacts and long loading times with other options, especially when adding a webcam or installing third party plugins. Setups not using recommended hardware are not officially supported.

Please note that the Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W are not recommended explicitly since severe performance issues were observed, caused by the WiFi interface when bandwidth is utilized (e.g. the webcam is streamed), negatively impacting printing quality. See also here. The Zero 2 however is recommended.

Installing OctoPi

OctoPi is available through the Raspberry Pi Imager, which you can use to download and setup OctoPi. You can install it yourself, or alternatively simply buy one of the available

All-in-one OctoPrint Kits

Here’s how to get started installing OctoPi:

  1. If you haven’t already, download and install Raspberry Pi Imager on your computer

  2. Find the OctoPi image under ‘Choose OS’, by selecting ‘Other Specific Purpose OS’ followed by ‘OctoPi’ and then the ‘stable’ version.

  3. Open advanced options by using the keyboard shortcut ++ to configure your Wifi connection:
    • Set your SSID, password and WiFi country using the options: Advanced Options - Wifi Setup
  4. Install the image to your SD card, then plug everything in to your Raspberry Pi and boot it up. Do not format the SD card after installing, even if prompted to do so. This will break the installation and you will have to start over!

  5. Log into your Pi via SSH (it is located at if your computer supports bonjour or the IP address assigned by your router), default username is , default password is . Run . Once that is open:

    1. Change the password via “Change User Password”
    2. Optionally: Change the configured timezone via “Localization Options” > “Timezone”.
    3. Optionally: Change the hostname via “Network Options” > “Hostname”. Your OctoPi instance will then no longer be reachable under but rather the hostname you chose postfixed with , so keep that in mind.

    You can navigate in the menus using the arrow keys and . To switch to selecting the buttons at the bottom use .

    You do not need to expand the filesystem, current versions of OctoPi do this automatically.

    You also do not need to manually enable the RaspiCam if you have one, that is already taken care of on the image as well.

  6. Access OctoPrint through or . is available too, with a self-signed certificate (which means your browser will warn you about it being invalid).

Please also refer to OctoPi’s README, especially the “How to use it” section.

Alternative Wifi Setup

If you aren’t using Raspberry Pi Imager, then you can also setup the Wifi connection using the file on the root of the installed card when using it like a thumb drive. Important: Do not use WordPad (Windows) or TextEdit (MacOS X) for this, those editors are known to mangle the file, making configuration fail. Use something like Notepad++, Atom or VSCode instead or at the very least heed the warnings in the file.

Please also refer take a look at the full WiFi setup guide in the FAQ that also includes troubleshooting tips.

Video

Thomas Sanladerer created a great video guide on how to get OctoPi 0.18 up and running.

Image Downloads

Raspberry Pi Imager will download the latest version of OctoPi for you, but if you want to download the images yourself you can do so here.

Stable OctoPi

OctoPi 0.18.0 & OctoPrint 1.7.2 SHA256:
Raspberry Pi 3B, 3B+, 4B or Zero 2 strongly recommended, Raspberry Pi Zero/Zero W not officially supported!
Image compatible with Raspberry Pi A, B, A+, B+, 2B, 3A+, 3B, 3B+, 4B 1/2/4/8GB, 400, Zero, Zero W and Zero 2.

OctoPi Nightlies

You can also get the 32bit nightlies here or the highly experimental 64bit nightlies here.

Further resources


The generic setup instructions boil down to

  1. Installing Python 3, including pip.
  2. Creating a virtual environment somewhere:
  3. Installing OctoPrint into that virtual environment:
  4. OctoPrint may then be started through or with an absolute path

More specific setup instructions for the most common runtime environments can be found below.

Linux

For installing OctoPrint on Linux, please take a look at the setup instructions for Raspbian on the forum. They should be pretty much identical on other Linux distributions.

Windows

For installing the OctoPrint server on a Windows system, please take a look at the setup instructions for Windows on the forum.

Mac

For installing the OctoPrint server on a Mac, please take a look at the setup instructions for MacOS on the forum.

Источник: https://octoprint.org/download/

Price: Free for personal use, commercial edition see  Price List

Version: V2.60, November 21, 2016

System Requirements: 4 GB RAM, Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10, Server 2008, 2012, 2016, 32 or 64 bit

Highlights

  • Backup logical drives and partitions to image files 

  • Browse images, view and extract files

  • Restore images to the same or a different drive

  • Create "hot images" with VSS technology

  • Compressed images

  • Copy directly from drive to drive 

  • Schedule automatic backups

  • Run from a WinPE Boot Medium or a Runtime Live CD

  • Examine file information in an XML file

  • Restore without need to reboot

Image and Backup Logical Drives and Partitions

DriveImage XML is an easy to use and reliable program for imaging and backing up partitions and logical drives.

DriveImage XML

DriveImage XML: Entry screen

Image creation uses Microsoft's Volume Shadow Services (VSS), allowing you to create safe "hot images", even from drives currently in use. Images are stored in XML files, allowing you to process them with 3rd party tools. Never again be stuck with a useless backup! Restore images to drives without having to reboot. DriveImage XML is now faster than ever, offering two different compression levels.

DriveImage XML runs under Windows XP and up. The program will backup, image and restore drives formatted with FAT and NTFS. 

Private vs. Commercial Edition

We offer two versions of DriveImage XML, a free one for home users, and a paid one for commercial users.

Private Edition: Private home users are allowed to use the Private Edition of DriveImage XML without charge. You are allowed to install DriveImage XML on your home PC. You must not use DriveImage XML commercially. No support is provided for the Private Edition.

Commercial Edition: If you are a business or organization or use DriveImage XML commercially, you need to purchase the Commercial Edition. The Commercial Edition is available with 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100-user licenses. The first screen of the Commercial Edition can be customized to show your name, address, support numbers, etc. The buyer of the Commercial Edition is allowed to install the denominated number of copies of DriveImage XML on computers in its own organization or on customer's computers. Support is provided to the buyer of the Commercial Edition for the period of one year and for the number of support incidences specified at the time of purchase. You are entitled to free updates for one year from the time of purchase. Buy the Commercial Edition

Источник: https://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm

UNetbootin

From the makers of UNetbootin: HabitLab, a tool to help you waste less time online (for Chrome)

FeaturesUsingSupported DistributionsFAQsLicenseWiki


UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions without burning a CD.

You can either let UNetbootin download one of the many distributions supported out-of-the-box for you, or supply your own Linux .iso file.

Features

UNetbootin can create a bootable Live USB drive

It loads distributions either by downloading a ISO (CD image) files for you, or by using an ISO file you've already downloaded.


screenshot

Using UNetbootin

Select an ISO file or a distribution to download, select a target drive (USB Drive or Hard Disk), then reboot once done. If your USB drive doesn't show up, reformat it as FAT32.


screenshot

screenshot

screenshot

If you used the "USB Drive" install mode: After rebooting, boot from the USB drive. On PCs, this usually involves pressing a button such as Esc or F12 immediately after you turn on your computer, while on Macs, you should hold the Option key before OSX boots.

If you used the "Hard Disk" install mode: After rebooting, select the UNetbootin entry from the Windows Boot Menu.

Supported Distributions

UNetbootin has built-in support for automatically downloading and loading the following distributions, though installing other distributions is also supported:


UNetbootin can also be used to load various system utilities, including:

Installing Other Distributions Using UNetbootin

Download and run UNetbootin, then select the "disk image" option and supply it with an ISO (CD image).


screenshot

UNetbootin doesn't use distribution-specific rules for making your live USB drive, so most Linux ISO files should load correctly using this option. However, not all distributions support booting from USB, and some others require extra boot options or other modifications before they can boot from USB drives, so these ISO files will not work as-is. Also, ISO files for non-Linux operating systems have a different boot mechanism, so don't expect them to work either.

FAQs

Distribution X isn't on the list of supported distributions, will it work?

» Maybe, see Installing Other Distributions Using UNetbootin.

UNetbootin isn't able to download the distribution, what should I do?

Download the ISO straight from the website, then provide it to UNetbootin via the diskimage option.

My USB stick isn't booting, what should I do?

Reformat the USB drive as FAT32, then use UNetbootin again to put your distribution on the USB stick.

My USB stick/hard drive isn't detected, what should I do?

Reformat the USB drive as FAT32, then use UNetbootin again. If it still isn't showing up, use the targetdrive command line option.

How do I use UNetbootin from the command line?

» See UNetbootin Command Line Options.

How does UNetbootin work, and what does it do?

» See How UNetbootin Works.

» See USB Drive and Hard Disk Install Modes.

Where can I report bugs, submit patches, etc?

First, make sure you are using the latest version available on this website.

» See Github Issues to file a bug report.

» See Github Pull Requests to submit a patch.

Does UNetbootin have any spyware, viruses, trojans, or other malware?

No; though some anti-virus products may raise "Trojan.generic" warnings due to the auto-uninstall feature, these are false positives. Just make sure you obtain UNetbootin from this site, not some shady third-party source. If you're absolutely paranoid, you can check the source code and compile it yourself.

Certified by Softpedia.comLinux Format Hottest Pick

What translations are available, and how can I use them?

A number of translations are included in the latest UNetbootin release. See the Translations Page for the status of each.

If a translation corresponding to your system's native language has already been included into UNetbootin, it should automatically load the corresponding translation. Alternatively, you can force the language to use via the lang=es command-line option, where you substitute es with the the 2-letter ISO 639-1 code for your language.

Can I help translate?

If you'd like to help translate this website, join the project on Transifex, then edit translations either on this website or on Transifex.

If you'd like to help translate the UNetbootin program itself, please use Launchpad Translations. If you are new to Launchpad, you will first have to join the corresponding Ubuntu Translators group for the language you intend to translate. For information on using the Launchpad Translations system, see the translations help page.

» See UNetbootin Translations

Removal Instructions (Applicable only to Hard Disk installs)

If using Windows, UNetbootin should prompt you to remove it the next time you boot into Windows. Alternatively, you can remove it via Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel.

If using Linux, re-run the UNetbootin executable (with root priveledges), and press OK when prompted to uninstall.

Removal is only required if you used the "Hard Drive" installation mode; to remove the bootloader from a USB drive, back up its contents and reformat it.

Uninstalling UNetbootin simply removes the UNetbootin entry from your boot menu; if you installed an operating system to a partition using UNetbootin, removing UNetbootin will not remove the OS.

To manually remove a Linux installation, you will have to restore the Windows bootloader using "fixmbr" from a recovery CD, and use Parted Magic to delete the Linux partition and expand the Windows partition.

Where's the source code, and how can I compile or modify it?

Source code is on Github, though you may prefer a tarball of the latest release.

» See Compiling UNetbootin.

» See UNetbootin Command Line Options.

» See Building a UNetbootin Plugin.

» See Using a UNetbootin Plugin.

» See Building a Custom UNetbootin Version.

» See List of Custom UNetbootin Versions and Plugins.

License

UNetbootin was created and written by Geza Kovacs (Github: gkovacs, Launchpad: gezakovacs, contact info).

Translators are listed on the translations page.

UNetbootin is licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL) Version 2 or above. Site materials, documentation, screenshots, and logos are licensed as Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike 3.0.

Other open-source projects from the creators of UNetbootin

HabitLab

HabitLab

A Chrome extension to help you waste less time online (on sites like Facebook, Youtube, etc) by experimenting with different interventions (news feed blockers, comment hiders, and more) to find the ones that work best for you.


Источник: https://unetbootin.github.io/

Data Backup in Depth: Concepts, Techniques, and Storage Technologies

In an increasingly digitized business landscape, data backup is vital for the survival of an organization. You can get hacked or ransomed, and lose your data to thieves who’ll sell your trade secrets to the highest bidder. Injected malware can corrupt your hard-earned information. Disgruntled employees or other insider threats can delete your valuable digital assets. Can you recover from data loss?

Data backup is a practice that combines techniques and solutions for efficient and cost-effective backup. Your data is copied to one or more locations, at pre-determined frequencies, and at different capacities. You can set up a flexible data backup operation, using your own architecture, or make use of available Backup as a Service (BaaS) solutions, mixing them up with local storage. Today, there are plenty of corporate storage TCO solutions to help you calculate costs, avoid data loss, and prevent data breaches.

In this article:

• What Is Data Backup?
• The Importance of a Disaster Recovery Plan: Alarming Statistics
• 6 Data Backup Options
• Backup Storage Technology

What Is a Data Backup?

Data backup is the practice of copying data from a primary to a secondary location, to protect it in case of a disaster, accident or malicious action. Data is the lifeblood of modern organizations, and losing data can cause massive damage and disrupt business operations. This is why backing up your data is critical for all businesses, large and small.

What does backup data mean?

Typically backup data means all necessary data for the workloads your server is running. This can include documents, media files, configuration files, machine images, operating systems, and registry files. Essentially, any data that you want to preserve can be stored as backup data.

Data backup includes several important concepts:

  • Backup solutions and tools—while it is possible to back up data manually, to ensure systems are backed up regularly and consistently, most organizations use a technology solution to back up their data.
  • Backup administrator—every organization should designate an employee responsible for backups. That employee should ensure backup systems are set up correctly, test them periodically and ensure that critical data is actually backed up.
  • Backup scope and schedule—an organization must decide on a backup policy, specifying which files and systems are important enough to be backed up, and how frequently data should be backed up.
  • Recovery Point Objective (RPO)—RPO is the amount of data an organization is willing to lose if a disaster occurs, and is determined by the frequency of backup. If systems are backed up once per day, the RPO is 24 hours. The lower the RPO, the more data storage, compute and network resources are required to achieve frequent backups.
  • Recovery Time Objective (RTO)—RTO is the time it takes for an organization to restore data or systems from backup and resume normal operations. For large data volumes and/or backups stored off-premises, copying data and restoring systems can take time, and robust technical solutions are needed to ensure a low RTO.

The Importance of a Disaster Recovery Plan: Alarming Statistics

To understand the potential impact of disasters on businesses, and the importance of having a data backup strategy as part of a complete disaster recovery plan, consider the following statistics:

  • Cost of downtime—according to Gartner, the average cost of downtime to a business is $5,600 per minute.
  • Survival rate—another Gartner study found only 6% of companies affected by a disaster that did not have disaster recovery in place survived and continued to operate more than two years after the disaster.
  • Causes of data loss—the most common causes of data loss are hardware/system failure (31%), human error (29%) and viruses, and malware of ransomware (29%).

6 Data Backup Options

There are many ways to backup your file. Choosing the right option can help ensure that you are creating the best data backup plan for your needs. Below are six of the most common techniques or technologies:

 

  1. Removable media
  2. Redundancy
  3. External hard drive
  4. Hardware appliances
  5. Backup software
  6. Cloud backup services

 

  1. Removable Media

A simple option is to backup files on removable media such as CDs, DVDs, newer Blu-Ray disks, or USB flash drives. This can be practical for smaller environments, but for larger data volumes, you’ll need to back up to multiple disks, which can complicate recovery. Also, you need to make sure you store your backups in a separate location, otherwise they may also be lost in a disaster. Tape backups also fall into this category.

  1. Redundancy

You can set up an additional hard drive that is a replica of a sensitive system’s drive at a specific point in time, or an entire redundant system. For example, another email server that is on standby, backing up your main email server. Redundancy is a powerful technique but is complex to manage. It requires frequent replication between cloned systems, and it’s only useful against the failure of a specific system unless the redundant systems are in a remote site.

  1. External Hard Drive

You can deploy a high-volume external hard drive in your network, and use archive software to save changes to local files to that hard drive. Archive software allows you to restore files from the external hardware with an RPO of only a few minutes. However, as your data volumes grow, one external drive will not be enough, or the RPO will substantially grow. Using an external drive necessitates having it deployed on the local network, which is risky.

  1. Hardware Appliances

Many vendors provide complete backup appliances, typically deployed as a 19” rack-mounted device. Backup appliances come with large storage capacity and pre-integrated backup software. You install backup agents on the systems you need to back up, define your backup schedule and policy, and the data starts streaming to the backup device. As with other options, try to place the backup device isolated from the local network and if possible, in a remote site.

  1. Backup Software

Software-based backup solutions are more complex to deploy and configure than hardware appliances, but offer greater flexibility. They allow you to define which systems and data you’d like to back up, allocate backups to the storage device of your choice, and automatically manage the backup process.

  1. Cloud Backup Services

Many vendors and cloud providers offer Backup as a Service (BaaS) solutions, where you can push local data to a public or private cloud and in case of disaster, recover data back from the cloud. BaaS solutions are easy to use and have the strong advantage that data is saved in a remote location. However, if using a public cloud, you need to ensure compliance with relevant regulations and standards, and consider that over time, data storage costs in the cloud will be much higher than the cost of deploying similar storage on-premises.

What Is a 3-2-1 Backup Strategy?

A 3-2-1 backup strategy is a method for ensuring that your data is adequately duplicated and reliably recoverable. In this strategy, three copies of your data are created on at least two different storage media and at least one copy is stored remotely: 

 

  • Three copies of data—your three copies include your original data and two duplicates. This ensures that a lost backup or corrupted media do not affect recoverability.
  • Two different storage types—reduces the risk of failures related to a specific medium by using two different technologies. Common choices include internal and external hard drives, removable media, or cloud storage.
  • One copy off-site—eliminates the risk associated with a single point of failure. Offsite duplicates are needed for robust disaster and data backup recovery strategies and can allow for failover during local outages. 

 

This strategy is considered a best practice by most information security experts and government authorities. It protects against both accidents and malicious threats, such as ransomware, and ensures reliable data backup and restoration.

Server Backup: Backing Up Critical Business Systems

The easiest way to backup a server is with a server backup solution. These solutions can come in the form of software or appliances. 

 

Server backup solutions are typically designed to help you backup server data to another local server, a cloud server, or a hybrid system. In particular, backup to hybrid systems is becoming more popular. This is because hybrid systems enable you to optimize resources, support easy multi-region duplication, and can enable faster recovery and failover.

 

In general, server backup solutions should include the following features:

 

  • Support for diverse file types—should not include any file types. In particular, solutions should support documents, spreadsheets, media, and configuration files. 
  • Backup location—you should be able to specify backup locations. The solution should support backup to a variety of locations and media, including on and off-site resources.
  • Scheduling and automation—in addition to enabling manual backups, solutions should support backup automation through scheduling. This helps ensure that you always have a recent backup and that backups are created in a consistent manner.
  • Backup management—you should be able to manage the lifecycle of backups, including number stored and length of time kept. Ideally, solutions also enable easy export of backups for transfer to external resources or for use in migration. 
  • Partition selection—partitions are isolated segments of a storage resource and are often used to separate data within a system. Solutions should enable you to independently backup data and restore partitions.
  • Data compression—to minimize the storage needed for numerous backups, solutions should compress backup data. This compression needs to be lossless and maintain the integrity of all data. 
  • Backup type selection—you should be able to create a variety of backup types, including full, differential, and incremental backups. Differential backups create a backup of changes since the last full backup while incremental records the changes since the last incremental backup. These types can help you reduce the size of your backups and speed backup time.
  • Scaling—backup abilities should not be limited by the volume of data on your servers. Solutions should scale as your data does and support backups of any size. 

Backup Storage Technology

Whichever technique you use to backup, at the end of the day, data must be stored somewhere. The storage technology used to hold your backup data is very significant:

  • The more cost-effective it is, the more data it is able to store, and the faster the storage and retrieval over a network, the lower your RPO and RTO will be.
  • The more reliable the storage technology, the safer your backups will be.

Below, you’ll find a review of backup storage technologies and their unique advantages.

Network Shares and NAS

You can set up centralized storage such as Network Attached Storage (NAS ), Storage Area Network (SAN), or regular hard disks mounted as a network share using Network File System (NFS) protocol. This is a convenient option for making large storage available to local devices for backup. However, it is susceptible to disasters affecting your entire data center, such as natural disasters or cyberattacks.

Tape Backup

Modern tape technology such as Linear Tape-Open 8 (LTO-8) can store up to 9 TB of data on a single tape. You can then ship the tape to a distant location, preferably at least 100 miles away from your primary location. Tape backups have been used for decades, but their obvious downside is the extremely high RTO and RPO due to the need to physically ship the tapes to and from a backup location. They also require a tape drive and an autoloader to perform backup and recovery, and this equipment is expensive.

Cloud-Based Object Storage

When using cloud providers, you have access to a variety of storage services. Cloud providers charge a flat price per Gigabyte, but costs can start to add up for frequent access. There are multiple tools that let you backup data to S3 automatically, both from within the cloud and from on-premise machines.

Local Object Storage with Cloudian

Cloudian® HyperStore® is a massive-capacity object storage device that is fully compatible with Amazon S3. It can store up to 1.5 Petabytes in a 4U Chassis device, allowing you to store up to 18 Petabytes in a single data center rack. HyperStore comes with fully redundant power and cooling, and performance features including 1.92TB SSD drives for metadata, and 10Gb Ethernet ports for fast data transfer.

cloudian hyperstore appliance

HyperStore is an on-premise data storage solution that can help you perform backups with RPO and RTO near zero, for almost any data volume.

Learn more about Cloudian® HyperStore®.

Learn More About Data Backup and Archive

Data backup is the process of protecting data in case of a disaster, accident, or malicious action, by copying it from one location to another. Data is the lifeblood of any organization, losing data can lead to serious damage and interrupt business operations. Therefore, backing up your dataup is critical for both large and small businesses.

 

Data backup is a broad topic. There’s a lot more to learn about data backup and archive. To continue your research, take a look at the rest of our blogs on this topic:

 

Ensuring Your Data with Effective Backup Storage

Backup storage refers to physical locations or devices for storing copies of data for recovery in the event of failure or data loss. Backup storage systems usually include both the hardware and the software for managing copies and recovery. This includes anything from a simple thumb drive to a hybrid system of local physical storage and remote cloud storage. 

 

This article explains the concept of backup storage, and shows the different types of backup storage methods, including Network Attached Storage (NAS), external hard drives, and cloud storage.

 

Read more: Ensuring Your Data with Effective Backup Storage

 

NAS Backup: Supporting the Shared Environment

NAS is a dedicated file storage system that enables multiple users to share data. You can access this shared storage on a Local Area Network (LAN) via an Ethernet connection. NAS is designed for handling unstructured data like video, audio, text files, websites, and Microsoft Office documents.

 

NAS devices usually store data essential to the daily operations of an organization. Therefore, you need to protect NAS devices to ensure the safety of data in events of a device failure, natural disasters, or human error.

 

Read more: NAS Backup: Supporting the Shared Environment

 

Using Storage Archives to Secure Data and Reduce Costs

A storage archive is a device or location for storing data that is rarely if ever accessed. Archives are usually more cost-effective than regular storage solutions, and they are frequently used for storing compliance data, log data, historical data, or legacy applications data.

 

There are three main types of data archives—governance archives, active archives, and cold data archives. This article explores the different storage archive options so you can build an effective archive strategy.

Read more: Using Storage Archives to Secure Data and Reduce Costs

 

Data Archives and Why You Need Them

Data archives and backups are not the same. Even though they are both used to store data, you should use them for different purposes. Data backups protect data that is currently in use. This enables you to restore corrupted or lost data from a single point in time. 

 

Data archives store data that is not currently in use. This enables you to restore data across a period of time. Archives store data in an indexed fashion, through the use of metadata. To retrieve data, you need to know the search parameters like author name or file contents.

 

Read more: Data Archives and Why You Need Them

 

Distributed Storage: What’s Inside Amazon S3?

Distributed storage systems are designed to split data across multiple physical servers, and usually across more than one data center. Distributed storage systems take the form of a cluster of storage units. Each cluster has a mechanism for data coordination and synchronization between cluster nodes.

 

Scalable cloud storage systems like Amazon S3 and Microsoft Azure Blob Storage are based on distributed storage. This article explains the concept of distributed storage technologies and services like Amazon S3.

 

Read more: Distributed Storage: What’s Inside Amazon S3?

 

Backup Cloud Storage: Ensuring Business Continuity

Cloud backup refers to the procedure of storing copies of cloud data in another location. This enables you to restore information in case of data compromise, downtime or damage. Additionally, organizations often need to backup cloud data to comply with regulations. They can face penalties and fines if they neglect to do so.

 

This article explains the concept of cloud backup and its importance, discusses on-premise backup solutions and compares the pros and cons of on-premise and cloud-based backup models.

 

Read more: Backup Cloud Storage: Ensuring Business Continuity

 

Storage Tiering: Making the Most of Your Storage Investment

Storage tiering is a method for efficiently using storage systems according to their importance or business value. A tiered storage solution provides several types of storage, including SSD disk drives, tape storage, and magnetic disk drives. The most frequently-accessed or important data is stored on the fastest, and most expensive SSD and the least important on the slowest, cheapest media.

Read more: Storage Tiering: Making the Most of Your Storage Investment

 

Private Cloud Storage: Bringing True Cloud Storage In-House

Private cloud storage is a service model for provisioning storage to users in an organization. This service model offers storage on-demand, with the same private cloud capabilities: on-demand access, resource pooling, elasticity and metering.

 

Companies usually invest in private cloud storage to address compliance or security requirements. Another use case is on-premises applications that require high-latency or high-throughput access to data, making it necessary to place the storage physically near to the storage consumer.

 

Read more: Private Cloud Storage: Bringing True Cloud Storage In-House

See Our Additional Guides on Key Data Protection Topics:

We have authored in-depth guides on several other data protection topics that can also be useful as you explore the world of data backup. Also refer to the complete guide to data breaches.

Data Protection Guide

Data protection relies on technologies such as data loss prevention (DLP), storage with built-in data protection, firewalls, encryption, and endpoint protection. Learn what is the difference between data protection and data privacy, and how to leverage best practice to ensure the continual protection of your data.

See top articles in our data protection guide:

Ransomware Data Recovery

Ransomware attacks prevent access to critical databases, systems, and networks. Learn how ransomware attacks work, and key ransomware data recovery techniques to recover your data.

See top articles in our ransomware data recovery guide:

Health Data Management Guide

Health Data Management (HDM), also known as Health Information Management (HIM) is the systematic organization of health data in digital form. Learn what is health data management, the types of data it encompasses, unique challenges and considerations for storing Petabytes of health data.

See top articles in our health data management guide:

Источник: https://cloudian.com/guides/data-backup/data-backup-in-depth/

UNetbootin

From the makers of UNetbootin: HabitLab, a tool to help you waste less time online (for Chrome)

FeaturesUsingSupported DistributionsFAQsLicenseWiki


UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions without burning a CD.

You can either let UNetbootin download one of the many distributions supported out-of-the-box for you, or supply your own Linux .iso file.

Features

UNetbootin can create a bootable Live USB drive

It loads distributions either by downloading a ISO (CD image) files for you, or by using an ISO file you've already downloaded.


screenshot

Using UNetbootin

Select an ISO file or a distribution to download, select a target drive (USB Drive or Hard Disk), then reboot once done. If your USB drive doesn't show up, reformat it as FAT32.


screenshot

screenshot

screenshot

If you used the "USB Drive" install mode: After rebooting, boot from the USB drive. On PCs, this usually involves pressing a button such as Esc or F12 immediately after you turn on your computer, while on Macs, you should hold the Option key before OSX boots.

If you used the "Hard Disk" install mode: After rebooting, select the UNetbootin entry from the Windows Boot Menu.

Supported Distributions

UNetbootin has built-in support for automatically downloading and loading the following distributions, though installing other distributions is also supported:


UNetbootin can also be used to load various system utilities, including:

Installing Other Distributions Using UNetbootin

Download and run UNetbootin, then select the "disk image" option and supply it disk snapshot de an ISO (CD image).


screenshot

UNetbootin doesn't use distribution-specific rules for making your live USB drive, so most Linux ISO files should load correctly using this option. However, not all distributions support booting from USB, and some others require extra boot options or other modifications before they can boot from USB drives, so these ISO files will not work as-is. Also, ISO files for non-Linux operating systems have a different boot mechanism, so don't expect them to work either.

FAQs

Distribution X isn't on the list of supported distributions, will it work?

» Maybe, see Installing Other Distributions Using UNetbootin.

UNetbootin isn't able to download the distribution, what should I do?

Download the ISO straight from the website, then provide it to UNetbootin via the diskimage option.

My USB stick isn't booting, what should I do?

Reformat the USB drive as FAT32, then use UNetbootin again to put your distribution on the USB stick.

My USB stick/hard drive isn't detected, what should I do?

Reformat the USB drive as FAT32, then use UNetbootin again. If it still isn't showing up, use the targetdrive command line option.

How do I use UNetbootin from the command line?

» See UNetbootin Command Line Options.

How does UNetbootin work, and what does it do?

» See How UNetbootin Works.

» See USB Drive and Hard Disk Install Modes.

Where can I report bugs, submit patches, etc?

First, make sure you are using the latest version available on this website.

» See Github Issues to file a bug report.

» See Github Pull Requests to submit a patch.

Does UNetbootin have any spyware, viruses, trojans, or other malware?

No; though some anti-virus products may raise "Trojan.generic" warnings due to the auto-uninstall feature, these are false positives. Just make sure you obtain UNetbootin from this site, not some shady third-party source. If you're absolutely paranoid, you can check the source code and compile it yourself.

Certified by Softpedia.comLinux Format Hottest Pick

What translations are available, and how can I use them?

A number of translations are included in the latest UNetbootin release. See the Translations Page for the status of each.

If a translation corresponding to your system's native language has already been included into UNetbootin, it should automatically load the corresponding translation. Alternatively, you can force the language to use via the lang=es command-line option, where you substitute es with the the 2-letter ISO 639-1 code for your language.

Can I help translate?

If you'd like to help translate this website, join the project on Transifex, then edit translations either on this website or on Transifex.

If you'd like to help translate the UNetbootin program itself, please use Launchpad Translations. If you are new to Launchpad, you will first have to join the corresponding Ubuntu Translators group for the language you intend to translate. For information on using the Launchpad Translations system, see the translations help page.

» See UNetbootin Translations

Removal Instructions (Applicable only to Hard Disk installs)

If using Windows, UNetbootin should prompt you to remove it the next time you boot into Windows. Alternatively, you can remove it via Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel.

If using Linux, re-run the UNetbootin executable (with root priveledges), and press OK when prompted to uninstall.

Removal is only required if you used the "Hard Drive" installation mode; to remove the bootloader from a USB drive, back up its contents and reformat it.

Uninstalling UNetbootin simply removes the UNetbootin entry from your boot menu; if you installed an operating system to a partition using UNetbootin, removing UNetbootin will not remove the OS.

To manually remove a Linux installation, you will have to restore the Windows bootloader using "fixmbr" from a recovery CD, and use Parted Magic to delete the Linux partition and expand the Windows partition.

Where's the source code, and how can I compile or modify it?

Source code is on Github, though you may prefer a tarball of the latest release.

» See Compiling UNetbootin.

» See UNetbootin Command Line Options.

» See Building a UNetbootin Plugin.

» See Using a UNetbootin Plugin.

» See Building a Custom UNetbootin Version.

» See List of Custom UNetbootin Versions and Plugins.

License

UNetbootin was created and written by Geza Kovacs (Github: gkovacs, Launchpad: gezakovacs, contact info).

Translators are listed on the translations page.

UNetbootin is Adobe Acrobat Pro DC 2021.007.20091 Crack Latest Version Download under the GNU General Public License (GPL) Version 2 or above. Site materials, documentation, screenshots, and logos are licensed as Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike 3.0.

Other open-source projects from the creators of UNetbootin

HabitLab

HabitLab

A Chrome extension to help you waste less time online (on sites like Facebook, Youtube, etc) by experimenting with different interventions (news feed blockers, comment hiders, and more) to find the ones that work best for you.


Источник: https://unetbootin.github.io/

OctoPi

Guy Sheffer maintains “OctoPi”, a Raspbian (and thus Debian) based SD card image for the Raspberry Pi that already includes OctoPrint plus everything you need to run it:

  • OctoPrint plus its dependencies
  • MJPG-Streamer for live viewing of prints and timelapse video creation, compatible with various USB webcams and the Raspberry Pi camera

Recommended hardware: Raspberry Pi 3B, 3B+, 4B or Zero 2. Expect print artifacts and long loading times with other options, especially when adding a webcam or installing third party plugins. Setups not using recommended hardware are not officially supported.

Please note that the Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W are not recommended explicitly since severe performance issues were observed, caused by the WiFi interface when bandwidth is utilized (e.g. the webcam is streamed), negatively impacting printing quality. See also here. The Zero 2 however is recommended.

Installing OctoPi

OctoPi is available through the Raspberry Pi Imager, which you can use to download and setup OctoPi. You can install it yourself, or alternatively simply buy one of the available

All-in-one OctoPrint Kits

Here’s how to get started installing OctoPi:

  1. If you haven’t already, download and install Raspberry Pi Imager on your computer

  2. Find the OctoPi image under ‘Choose OS’, by selecting ‘Other Specific Purpose OS’ followed by ‘OctoPi’ and then the ‘stable’ version.

  3. Open advanced options by using the keyboard shortcut ++ to configure your Wifi connection:
    • Set your SSID, password and WiFi country using the options: Advanced Options - Wifi Setup
  4. Install the image to your SD card, then plug everything in to your Raspberry Pi and boot it up. Do not format the SD card after installing, even if prompted to do so. This will break the installation and you will have to start over!

  5. Log into your Pi via SSH (it is located at if your computer supports bonjour or the IP address assigned by your router), default username isdefault password is. Run. Once that is open:

    1. Change the password via “Change User Password”
    2. Optionally: Change the configured timezone via “Localization Options” > “Timezone”.
    3. Optionally: Change the hostname via “Network Options” > “Hostname”. Your OctoPi instance will then no longer be reachable under but rather the hostname you chose postfixed withso keep that disk snapshot de mind.

    You can navigate in the menus using the arrow keys and. To switch to selecting the buttons at the bottom use .

    You do not need to expand the filesystem, current versions of OctoPi do this automatically.

    You also do not need to manually enable the RaspiCam if you have one, that is already taken care of on the image as well.

  6. Access OctoPrint through or. is available too, with a self-signed certificate (which means your browser will warn you about it being invalid).

Please also refer to OctoPi’s README, especially the “How to use it” section.

Alternative Wifi Setup

If you aren’t using Raspberry Pi Imager, then you can also setup the Wifi connection using the file on the root of the installed card when using it like a thumb drive. Important: Do not use WordPad (Windows) or TextEdit (MacOS X) disk snapshot de for this, those editors are known to mangle the file, making configuration fail. Use something like Notepad++, Atom or VSCode instead or at the very least heed the warnings in the file.

Please also refer take a look at the full WiFi setup guide in the FAQ that also includes troubleshooting tips.

Video

Thomas Sanladerer created a great video guide on how to get OctoPi 0.18 up and running.

Image Downloads

Raspberry Pi Imager will download the latest version of OctoPi for you, but if you want to download the images yourself you can do so here.

Stable OctoPi

OctoPi 0.18.0 & OctoPrint 1.7.2 SHA256:
Raspberry Pi 3B, 3B+, 4B or Zero 2 strongly recommended, Raspberry Pi Zero/Zero W not officially supported!
Image compatible with Raspberry Pi A, B, A+, B+, 2B, 3A+, 3B, 3B+, 4B 1/2/4/8GB, 400, Zero, Zero W and Zero 2.

OctoPi Nightlies

You can also get the 32bit nightlies here or the highly experimental 64bit nightlies here.

Further resources


The generic setup instructions boil down to

  1. Installing Python 3, including pip.
  2. Creating a virtual environment somewhere:
  3. Installing OctoPrint into disk snapshot de virtual environment:
  4. OctoPrint may then be started through or with an absolute path

More specific setup instructions for the most common runtime environments can be found below.

Linux

For installing OctoPrint on Linux, please take a look at the setup instructions for Raspbian on the forum. They should be pretty much identical on other Linux distributions.

Windows

For installing the OctoPrint server on a Windows system, please take a look at the setup instructions for Windows on the forum.

Mac

For installing the OctoPrint server on a Mac, please take a look at the setup instructions for MacOS on the forum.

Источник: https://octoprint.org/download/

You can access the contents of a disk image the same way that you access other volumes and external hard drives on macOS. Double-click on the disk image file to mount its filesystem, then navigate the filesystem in the Finder to access individual files and folders. If you have the permission to access the files that you would like to restore, simply drag those items to the volume that you would like to restore them to.

Restoring individual items or an entire disk image to another hard drive using CCC

To restore files or an entire filesystem from a disk image:

  1. Open CCC
  2. Select Restore from disk image. from the Source selector and locate your backup disk image. CCC will mount the disk image for you.
  3. Choose a volume from the Destination selector. You may not choose the current startup disk as a destination, however you may choose to restore to a folder on the current startup disk.
  4. If you do not want to restore everything, click the Task Filter button and define a filter to exclude any content that you do not wish to restore.
  5. Click the Start button.

Using Migration Assistant to migrate data from a disk image

If you have a clean installation of macOS and want to restore your user data from a full-system backup on a disk how to register edraw max for free - Activators Patch, you can use Migration Assistant for this task. Simply mount the disk image, then open Migration Assistant and proceed as directed, using the mounted disk image as the source. Note that Migration Assistant will only accept a disk image that has a full system backup or a whole Data volume backup, it will not accept a collection of user data (e.g. just a user home folder).

Migration Assistant and the CCC SafetyNet

If your backup volume has a "_CCC SafetyNet" folder, you can move that folder to the Trash before using Migration Assistant to avoid copying that folder during a migration. This is particularly important if that folder has a lot of data in it and you're migrating to a disk that is smaller than the backup volume. If you would like to retain the SafetyNet folder on the backup volume, don't empty the Trash. After Migration Assistant has completed, then you can move the SafetyNet folder back to the root of the backup volume.

Источник: https://bombich.com/de/kb/ccc6/restoring-from-disk-image

Acronis Universal Restore Ensures Bare-Metal Restore of Dissimilar Hardware

What is Bare-Metal Restore?

Bare-metal restore makes recovery very fast – you avoid a lengthy OS installation and configuration process, driver rollout, and application installation. If you have a system image created with disk-imaging software, you can reinstall and reconfigure in minutes instead of hours.

Advantages of Bare-Metal Restore

Bare-metal restore is very fast — it restores your entire environment, complete with operating system, applications, settings, data, and even the layout of icons on your desktop. It is also very easy — you don’t need to build your computer’s setup brick-by-brick. Instead, you get the entire house in one easy recovery!

1

Bare-metal recovery is also very safe. If your computer is infected by a virus or ransomware, recovering the clean image will get rid of potential sources or the results of infection, including backdoors, locked or encrypted files, and other potential cyber dangers.

Nowadays, disk-imaging backup and bare-metal recovery technologies almost completely replace traditional file and data backup solutions.

Caveats of Bare-Metal Restore

If you try to recover an entire disk image to a new system that has dissimilar hardware, it may fail to boot. Why is this?

When you install an operating system, the installer analyzes your hardware — your CPU, motherboard, HDD (Hard Disk Drive) or RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) controller, network, graphic card, etc. — and configures the operating system accordingly by installing the appropriate drivers. When the operating system boots, it only loads the drivers needed for your exact hardware.

For some devices, such as graphic cards or sound devices, changing the hardware is not an issue. You can reinstall the drivers when the system loads.

However, when it comes to the CPU, motherboard, or your HDD controller, the driver must match because the system needs these drivers to boot. These devices are boot-critical and the system will not boot without the proper drivers.

Consequently, if you create an image on one machine and try to recover it to another system with dissimilar boot-critical devices, the boot may fail since the drivers do not match.

However, this can be easily fixed by using dissimilar hardware restore technology — Acronis Universal Restore.

Dissimilar Hardware Restore

Dissimilar hardware restore is designed to address boot-critical hardware changes. This amazing technology can reconfigure your operating system without booting by changing settings and injecting and activating drivers to ensure the operating system boots.

Acronis invented this technology and brought it to the market in 2006. Since then, Acronis has been perfecting the technology, which now lets you restore a disk-image to any dissimilar hardware — even virtual and cloud!

Acronis Universal Restore – How It Works

Acronis Universal Restore – How It Works

After recovering your disk-image as-is, Acronis Universal Restore analyzes the new hardware platform and tunes the Windows or Linux settings to match the new requirements.

CPU:

Acronis Universal Restore analyzes the change in CPU type (Intel or AMD), the number of CPUs (single-CPU or SMP (Symmetric Multiprocessing)), and changes the settings of the operating system to match. This ensures that the operating system can utilize multiple CPUs and/or a different number of cores.

HAL:

Acronis Universal Restore analyzes each machine type — including the motherboard, chipsets, and hypervisor configuration — and changes the HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) setting of the operating system. This is especially important if your new system has a different number of CPUs or is a different CPU brand.

Boot-Critical Hardware Drivers:

Acronis Universal Restore analyzes the target hardware and injects all the drivers that are required to boot the operating system. These include SATA, SAS, SCSI and RAID drivers, as well as SAN HBA. This is the most critical part of the process.

If Acronis Universal Restore cannot find the appropriate drivers in Windows, you are prompted to provide standard Microsoft drivers. These are the same drivers you put on a flash drive or floppy disk using the Windows F6 installation method. Usually, there will be files with INF and SYS extensions.

In Linux, Acronis Universal Restore activates the driver modules that are already part of your Linux kernel.

In addition, Acronis Universal Restore disables all boot-critical hardware drivers that are not needed on the new machine. This eliminates compatibility issues.

Network drivers:

To ensure network connectivity, Acronis Universal Restore injects and activates any required network drivers.

On Windows systems, Universal Restore disables and removes the configuration of the old network adapters so you do not need to delete hidden or missing devices when configuring the network.

UEFI-BIOS conversion:

Many modern computers use the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) method of booting the operating system, while virtual servers and older machines predominantly use BIOS (Basic Input/Output System).

Acronis Universal Restore automatically changes the partition layout, boot loader settings, and boot configuration so you can restore the image of the original BIOS machine to disk snapshot de UEFI platform or vice versa.

Acronis Universal Restore will detect your operating system’s ability of booting on the target machine’s BIOS or UEFI platform, and will choose the appropriate method automatically – no interaction from your side is required.

MBR-GPT Conversion:

For many UEFI systems, your hard disk is divided with a newer GPT (GUID Partition Table) partition layout, which allows up to 128 partitions and supports very large (>2TB) disks. The BIOS systems require the old MBR (Master Boot Record) partitioning style (4 primary partitions, <2TB disks).

Acronis automatically adjusts the partition layout, boot loader settings, and boot configuration so you can restore the image of the original MBR disk to the GPT or vice versa. The conversion works in any direction, as long as the disk and the operating system support it.

Summary

Bare-metal restore, paired with Acronis Universal Restore, is the fastest method to recover your entire PC or servers to the same or dissimilar hardware. You can even migrate your systems from physical to virtual (P2V), virtual-to-virtual (V2V), or even virtual-to-cloud (V2C).

This technology drastically reduces your Recovery Time Objectives (RTO) and reduces downtime costs, meaning that implementation of a bare-metal restore solution yields a positive Return-on-Investment (ROI) after a single recovery.

Источник: https://www.acronis.com/en-us/articles/bare-metal-restore/

Data Backup in Depth: Concepts, Techniques, and Storage Technologies

In an increasingly digitized business landscape, data backup is vital for the survival of an organization. You can get hacked or ransomed, and lose your data to thieves who’ll sell your trade secrets to the highest bidder. Injected malware can corrupt your hard-earned information. Disgruntled employees or other insider threats can delete your valuable digital assets. Can you recover from data loss?

Data backup is a practice that combines techniques and solutions for efficient and cost-effective backup. Your data is copied to one or more locations, at pre-determined frequencies, and at different capacities. You can set up a flexible data backup operation, using your own architecture, or make use of available Backup as a Service (BaaS) solutions, mixing them up with local storage. Today, there are plenty of corporate storage TCO solutions to help you calculate costs, avoid data loss, and prevent data breaches.

In this article:

• What Is Data Backup?
• The Importance of a Disaster Recovery Plan: Alarming Statistics
• 6 Data Backup Options
• Backup Storage Technology

What Is a Data Backup?

Data backup is the practice of copying data from a primary to a secondary location, to protect it in case of a disaster, accident or malicious action. Data is the lifeblood of modern organizations, and losing data can cause massive damage and disrupt business operations. This is why backing up your data is critical for all businesses, large and small.

What does backup data mean?

Typically backup data means all necessary data for the workloads your server is running. This can include documents, media files, configuration files, machine images, operating systems, and registry files. Essentially, any data that you want to preserve can be stored as backup data.

Data backup includes several important concepts:

  • Backup solutions and tools—while it is possible to back up data manually, to ensure systems are backed up regularly and consistently, most organizations disk snapshot de a technology solution to back up their data.
  • Backup administrator—every organization should designate an employee responsible for backups. That employee should ensure backup systems are set up correctly, test them periodically and ensure that critical data is actually backed up.
  • Backup scope and schedule—an organization must decide on a backup policy, specifying which files and systems are important enough to be backed up, and how frequently data should be backed up.
  • Recovery Point Objective (RPO)—RPO is the amount of data an organization is willing to lose if a disaster internet download accelerator serial key - Crack Key For U, and is determined by the frequency of backup. If systems are backed up once per day, the RPO is 24 hours. The lower the RPO, the more data storage, compute and network resources are required to achieve frequent backups.
  • Recovery Time Objective (RTO)—RTO is the time it takes for an organization to restore data or systems from backup and resume normal operations. For large data volumes and/or backups stored off-premises, copying data and restoring systems can take time, and robust technical solutions are needed to ensure a low RTO.

The Importance of a Disaster Recovery Plan: Alarming Statistics

To understand the potential impact of disasters on businesses, and the importance of having a data backup strategy as part of a complete disaster recovery plan, consider the following statistics:

  • Cost of downtime—according to Gartner, the average cost of downtime to a business is $5,600 per minute.
  • Survival rate—another Gartner study found only 6% of companies affected by a disaster that did not have disaster recovery in place survived and continued to operate more than two years after the disaster.
  • Causes of data loss—the most common causes of data loss are hardware/system failure (31%), human error (29%) and viruses, and malware of ransomware (29%).

6 Data Backup Options

There are many ways to backup your file. Choosing the right option can help ensure that you are creating the best data backup plan for your needs. Below are six of the most common techniques or technologies:

 

  1. Removable media
  2. Redundancy
  3. External hard drive
  4. Hardware appliances
  5. Backup software
  6. Cloud backup services

 

  1. Removable Media

A simple option is to backup files on removable media such as CDs, DVDs, newer Blu-Ray disks, or USB flash drives. This can be practical for smaller environments, but for larger data volumes, you’ll need to back up to multiple disks, which can complicate recovery. Also, you need to make sure you store your backups in a separate location, otherwise they may also be lost in a disaster. Tape backups also fall into this category.

  1. Redundancy

You can set up an additional hard drive that is a replica of a sensitive system’s drive at a specific point in time, or an entire redundant system. For example, another email server that is on standby, backing up your main email server. Redundancy is a powerful technique but is complex to manage. It requires frequent replication between cloned systems, and it’s only useful against the failure of a specific system unless the redundant systems are in a remote site.

  1. External Hard Drive

You can deploy a high-volume external hard drive in your network, and use archive software to save changes to local files to that hard drive. Archive software allows you to restore files from the external hardware with an RPO of only a few minutes. However, as your data volumes grow, one external drive will not be enough, or the RPO will substantially grow. Using an external drive necessitates having it deployed on the local network, which is CINEMA 4D Studio R24.116 Crack 2021 Full Version Download Hardware Appliances

Many vendors provide complete backup appliances, typically deployed as a 19” rack-mounted device. Backup appliances come with large storage capacity and pre-integrated backup software. You install backup agents on the systems you need to back up, define your backup schedule and policy, and the data starts streaming to the backup device. As with other options, try to place the backup device isolated from the local network and if possible, in a remote site.

  1. Backup Software

Software-based backup solutions are more complex to deploy and configure than hardware appliances, but offer greater flexibility. They allow you to define which systems and data you’d like to back up, allocate backups to the storage device of your choice, and automatically manage the backup process.

  1. Cloud Backup Services

Many vendors and cloud providers offer Backup as a Service (BaaS) solutions, where you can push local data to a public or private cloud and in case of disaster, recover data back from the cloud. BaaS solutions are easy to use and have the strong advantage that data is saved in a remote location. However, if using a public cloud, you need to ensure compliance with relevant regulations and standards, and consider that over time, data storage costs in the cloud will be much higher than the cost of deploying similar storage on-premises.

What Is a 3-2-1 Backup Strategy?

A 3-2-1 backup strategy is a method for ensuring that your data is adequately duplicated and reliably recoverable. In this strategy, three copies of your data are created on at least two different storage media and at least one copy is stored remotely: 

 

  • Three copies of data—your three copies include your original data and two duplicates. This ensures that a lost backup or corrupted media do not affect recoverability.
  • Two different storage types—reduces the risk of failures related to a specific medium by using two different technologies. Common choices include internal and external hard drives, removable media, or cloud storage.
  • One copy off-site—eliminates the risk associated with a single point of failure. Offsite duplicates are needed for robust disaster and data backup recovery strategies and can allow for failover during local outages. 

 

This strategy is considered a best practice by most information security experts and government authorities. It protects against both accidents and malicious threats, such as ransomware, and ensures reliable data backup and restoration.

Server Backup: Backing Up Critical Business Systems

The easiest way to backup a server is with a server backup solution. These solutions can come in the form of software or appliances. 

 

Server backup solutions are typically designed to help you backup server data to another local server, a cloud server, or a hybrid system. In particular, backup to hybrid systems is becoming more popular. This is because hybrid systems enable you to optimize resources, support easy multi-region duplication, and can enable faster recovery and failover.

 

In general, server backup disk snapshot de should include the following features:

 

  • Support for diverse file types—should not include any file types. In particular, solutions should support documents, spreadsheets, media, and configuration files. 
  • Backup location—you should be able to specify backup locations. The solution should support backup to a variety of locations and media, including on and off-site resources.
  • Scheduling and automation—in addition to enabling manual backups, solutions should support backup automation through scheduling. This helps ensure that you always have a recent backup and that backups are created in a consistent manner.
  • Backup management—you should be able to manage the lifecycle of backups, including number stored and length of time kept. Ideally, solutions also enable easy export of backups for transfer to external resources or for use in migration. 
  • Partition selection—partitions are isolated segments of a storage resource and are often used to separate data within a system. Solutions should enable you to independently backup data and restore partitions.
  • Data compression—to minimize the storage needed for numerous backups, solutions should compress backup data. This compression needs to be lossless and maintain the integrity of all data. 
  • Backup type selection—you should be able to create a variety of backup types, including full, differential, and incremental backups. Differential backups create a backup of changes since the last full backup while incremental records the changes since the last incremental backup. These types can help you reduce the size of your backups and speed backup time.
  • Scaling—backup abilities should not be limited by the volume of data on your servers. Solutions should scale as your data does and support backups of any size. 

Backup Storage Technology

Whichever technique you use to backup, at the end of the day, data must be stored somewhere. The storage technology used to hold your backup data is very significant:

  • The more cost-effective it is, the more data it is able to store, and the faster the storage and retrieval over a network, the lower your RPO and RTO will be.
  • The more reliable the storage technology, the safer your backups will be.

Below, you’ll find a review of backup storage technologies and their unique advantages.

Network Shares and NAS

You can set up centralized storage such as Network Attached Storage (NAS ), Storage Area Network (SAN), or regular hard disks mounted as a network share using Network File System (NFS) protocol. This is a convenient option for making large storage available to local devices for backup. However, it is susceptible to disasters affecting your entire data center, such as natural disasters or cyberattacks.

Tape Backup

Modern tape technology such as Linear Tape-Open 8 (LTO-8) can store up to 9 TB of data on a single tape. You can then ship the tape to a distant location, preferably at least 100 miles away from your primary location. Tape backups have been used for decades, but their obvious downside is the extremely high RTO and RPO due to the need to physically ship the tapes to and from a backup location. They also require a tape drive and an autoloader to perform backup and recovery, and this equipment is expensive.

Cloud-Based Object Storage

When using cloud providers, you have access to a variety of storage services. Cloud providers charge a flat price per Gigabyte, but costs can start to add up for frequent access. There are multiple tools that let you backup data to S3 automatically, both from within the cloud and from on-premise machines.

Local Object Storage with Cloudian

Cloudian® HyperStore® is a massive-capacity object storage device that is fully compatible with Amazon S3. It can store up to 1.5 Petabytes in a 4U Chassis device, allowing you to store up to 18 Petabytes in a single data center rack. HyperStore comes with fully redundant power and cooling, and performance features including 1.92TB SSD drives for metadata, and 10Gb Ethernet ports for fast data transfer.

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HyperStore is an on-premise data storage solution that can help you perform backups with RPO and RTO near zero, for almost any data volume.

Learn more about Cloudian® HyperStore®.

Learn More About Data Backup and Archive

Data backup is the process of protecting data in case of a disaster, accident, or malicious action, by copying it from one location to another. Data is the lifeblood of any organization, losing data can lead to serious damage and interrupt business operations. Therefore, backing up your dataup is critical for both large and small businesses.

 

Data backup is a broad topic. There’s a lot more to learn about data backup and archive. To continue your research, take a look at the rest of our blogs on this topic:

 

Ensuring Your Data with Effective Backup Storage

Backup storage refers to physical locations or devices for storing copies of data for recovery in the event of failure or data loss. Backup storage systems usually include both the hardware and the software for managing copies and recovery. This includes anything from a simple thumb drive to a hybrid system of local physical storage and remote cloud storage. 

 

This article explains the concept of backup storage, and shows the different types of backup storage methods, including Network Attached Storage (NAS), external hard drives, and cloud storage.

 

Read more: Ensuring Your Data with Effective Backup Storage

 

NAS Backup: Supporting the Shared Environment

NAS is a dedicated file storage system that enables multiple users to share data. You can access this shared storage on a Local Area Network (LAN) via an Ethernet connection. NAS is designed for handling unstructured data like video, audio, text files, websites, and Microsoft Office documents.

 

NAS devices usually store data essential to the daily operations of an organization. Therefore, you need to protect NAS devices to ensure the safety of data in events of a device failure, natural disasters, or human error.

 

Read more: NAS Backup: Supporting the Shared Environment

 

Using Storage Archives to Secure Data and Reduce Costs

A storage archive is a device or location for storing data that is rarely if ever accessed. Archives are usually more cost-effective than regular storage solutions, and they are frequently used for storing compliance data, log data, historical data, or legacy applications data.

 

There are three main types of data archives—governance archives, active archives, and cold data archives. This article explores the different storage archive options so you can build an effective archive strategy.

Read more: Using Storage Archives to Secure Data and Reduce Costs

 

Data Archives and Why You Need Them

Data archives and backups are not the same. Even though they are both used to store data, you should use them for different purposes. Data backups protect data that is currently in use. This enables you to restore corrupted or lost data from a single point in time. 

 

Data archives store data that is not currently in use. This enables you to restore data across a period of time. Archives store data in an indexed fashion, through the use of metadata. To retrieve data, you need to know the search parameters like author name or file contents.

 

Read more: Data Archives and Why You Need Them

 

Distributed Disk snapshot de What’s Inside Amazon S3?

Distributed storage systems are designed to split data across multiple physical servers, and usually across more than one data center. Distributed storage systems take the form of a cluster of storage units. Each cluster has a mechanism for data coordination and synchronization between cluster nodes.

 

Scalable cloud storage systems like Amazon S3 and Microsoft Azure Blob Storage are based on distributed storage. This article explains the concept of distributed storage technologies and services like Amazon S3.

 

Read more: Distributed Storage: What’s Inside Amazon S3?

 

Backup Cloud Storage: Ensuring Business Continuity

Cloud backup refers to the procedure of storing copies of cloud data in another location. This enables you to restore information in case of data compromise, downtime or damage. Additionally, organizations often need to backup cloud data to comply with regulations. They can face penalties and fines if they neglect to do so.

 

This article explains the concept of cloud backup and its importance, discusses on-premise backup solutions and compares the pros and cons of on-premise and cloud-based backup models.

 

Read more: Backup Cloud Storage: Ensuring Business Continuity

 

Storage Tiering: Making the Most of Your Storage Investment

Storage tiering is a method for efficiently using storage systems according to their importance or business value. A tiered storage solution provides several types of storage, including SSD disk drives, tape storage, and magnetic disk drives. The most frequently-accessed or important data is stored on the fastest, and most expensive SSD and the least important on the slowest, cheapest media.

Read more: Storage Tiering: Making the Most of Your Storage Investment

 

Private Cloud Storage: Bringing True Cloud Storage In-House

Private cloud storage is a service model for provisioning storage to users in an Avira Prime Free Activate. This service model offers storage on-demand, with the same private cloud capabilities: on-demand access, resource pooling, elasticity and metering.

 

Companies usually invest in private cloud storage to address compliance or security requirements. Another use case is on-premises applications that require high-latency or high-throughput access to data, making it necessary to place the storage physically near to the storage consumer.

 

Read more: Private Cloud Storage: Bringing True Cloud Storage In-House

See Our Additional Guides on Key Data Protection Topics:

We have authored in-depth guides on several other data protection topics that can also be useful as you explore the world bootstrap studio 4.3.2 crack - Crack Key For U data backup. Also refer to the complete guide to data breaches.

Data Protection Guide

Data protection relies on technologies such as data loss prevention (DLP), storage with built-in data protection, firewalls, encryption, and endpoint protection. Learn what is the difference between data protection disk snapshot de data privacy, and how to leverage best practice to ensure the continual protection of your data.

See top articles in our data protection guide:

Ransomware Data Recovery

Ransomware attacks prevent access to critical databases, systems, and networks. Learn how ransomware attacks work, and key ransomware data recovery techniques to recover your data.

See top articles in our ransomware data recovery guide:

Health Data Management Guide

Health Data Management (HDM), also known as Health Information Management (HIM) is the systematic organization of health data in digital form. Learn what is health data management, the types of data it encompasses, unique challenges and considerations for storing Petabytes of health data.

See top articles in our health data management guide:

Источник: https://cloudian.com/guides/data-backup/data-backup-in-depth/

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Version: V2.60, November 21, 2016

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  • Create "hot images" with VSS technology

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Image and Backup Logical Drives and Partitions

DriveImage XML is an easy to use and reliable program for imaging and backing up partitions and logical drives.

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Image creation uses Microsoft's Volume Shadow Services (VSS), allowing you to create safe "hot images", even from drives currently in use. Images are stored in XML files, allowing you to process them with 3rd party tools. Never again be stuck with a useless backup! Restore images to drives without having to reboot. DriveImage XML is now faster disk snapshot de ever, offering two different compression levels.

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Commercial Edition: If you are a business or organization or use DriveImage XML commercially, you need to purchase the Commercial Edition. The Commercial Edition is available with 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100-user licenses. The first screen of the Commercial Edition can be customized to show your name, address, support numbers, etc. The buyer of the Commercial Edition is allowed to install the denominated number of copies of DriveImage XML on computers in its own organization or on customer's computers. Support is provided to the buyer of the Commercial Edition for the period of one year and for the number of support incidences specified at the time of purchase. You are entitled to free updates for one year from the time of purchase. Buy the Commercial Edition

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